How DBMS Vendors Admit to an Architectural Limitation: Part 2 – Teradata Intelligent Memory

This is the second post (see Part 1 here) on how vendors adjust their architecture without admitting that the previous architecture was flawed. This time we’ll consider Teradata and in-memory…. When SAP HANA appeared Teradata went on the warpath with a series of posts and statements that were pointed but oddly miscued (see the references below).…

How DBMS Vendors Admit to an Architectural Limitation: Part 1 – Oracle Exadata

Database vendors don’t usually admit to shortcomings… they protest that they have no shortcomings until the market suggests otherwise… then they make some sort of change that signals an admission. This post will explore three of these admissions: Oracle and the shared-nothing architecture, DB2 on the mainframe and the shared-nothing architecture, and Teradata and in-memory…

No Empathy for DevOps

Ugh. I loved the concept of DevOps and talked it up in the companies I was associated with. Within a database DevOps had a long history as both database products, database ETL facilities, and end-user applications became more dev-operable. The idea that infrastructure had to become code has been a part of the best DBA’s mantra…

An Architecture for the IoT – Part 1

There are so many things in the Internet of Things (IoT) that might record data into your data fabric that a new approach may be required. Let’s think about this… define some terms, and see how these terms fit into current data fabric thinking, let’s consider how they fit into a more modern logical data warehouse…

Part 8 – How Hadooped is SQL Server PDW with Polybase?

Now for SQL Server… continuing the thread on RDBMS-Hadoop integration (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7) I have suggested that we could evaluate integration architecture using three criteria: How parallel are the pipes to move data between the RDBMS and the parallel file system; Is there intelligence to push down predicates; and Is…