Hadoop Squeezes Greenplum

For several years now I have been suggesting that Hadoop will squeeze the big data RDBMSs: Teradata, Exadata, Greenplum, and Netezza… squeezing them first out of the big data end of the market and then impinging on the high-end of the EDW space. Further I have suggested that there may be a significant and immediate TCO reduction from using Hadoop with your EDW RDBMS which squeezes these product’s market faster and further.

Originally I suggested that Greenplum and Netezza would feel the squeeze first since they were embracing Hadoop directly and at the expense of their RDBMS offerings. Greenplum took this further by trying to compete on price… cutting the price of the GPDB and then introducing HAWQ, basically GPDB on HDFS, at a Hadoop DBMS price point. These moves coupled with a neglect of the EDW market where Greenplum made its name apparently has allowed Hadoop to squeeze Greenplum out of the commercial market.

My network has been humming with rumors from reliable sources for 4+ weeks now… and I am now getting confirmation from both inside and outside Pivotal that the Greenplum software will move to open source in short order. The details are being worked out… and while there may still be a change of heart… it seems to be a done deal. The buzzness plan that Greenplum embarked on prior to the EMC acquisition in 2010 has not been a commercial success.

No one is sorrier to see this than me. Greenplum had a real shot at success. It was a very solid piece of work leading the space with strong architectural extensions like data flow shared nothingness, hybrid row/columnar capabilities, and into big data applications. The ORCA optimizer had the potential to change the game again.

Greenplum was nearly profitable in 2009 running hard at Teradata and Exadata and Netezza in the EDW space. The EDW market is tough… so we have to be fair and point out that pursuing this market may have led to the same result… but a small-market analytics play was followed by an open-source Hadoop play that could only end in squeezing Greenplum. There was never really a business plan with a win at the end.

Hopefully by open sourcing Greenplum some of the sound software will make it into PostgreSQL… but dishing Greenplum into the open source space with few developers and no community dishes it into the same space that Informix, Red Brick, and others sit. I know that I suggested open sourcing Greenplum over 18 months ago (see the wacky idea here)… but the idea then, as now, amounts to capitualization. I just declared what seemed to me to be inevitable a little sooner than Pivotal.

Teradata has now further embraced Hadoop… and they run the risk of repeating the Greenplum downturn. They have a much stronger market platform to work from… but in the long run this may also be a deadly embrace.

So here is another wacky idea. The only successful business model around open source software to date (which is not to say that there is not some other model to be discovered) generates revenue from support and services and just a little software around the edges. Teradata has a support team and a services business that knows big data and is embedded in the enterprise… Cloudera, Hortonworks, and MapR are not close here. Were Teradata to go after the Hadoop market with their own distribution (not much of a barrier to entry here.. just download the Apache stuff and build a team of committers… they might even be able to pick up the Pivotal team)… they would start from a spot way ahead of the start-ups in several respects… in several hard respects. Further they have Aster IP which could qualify as software around the edges. As a Hadoop player Teradata could more easily manage how Hadoop squeezes their business, mitigate risk, and emerge a big winner in the big data space.

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2 thoughts on “Hadoop Squeezes Greenplum

  1. Great article, Rob, but why do you think Greenplum demise is directly affected by Hadoop growth ? Could it not be that they’d go down even if Hadoop didn’t exist ?

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    • I mentioned this possibility in the post, Ranko. In Greenplum’s case the issue was not so much that Hadoop grew into their space as that they positioned GPDB and HAWQ as head-to-head competition with the Hadoop ecosystem… And even when they could win the business they could not make enough money on their software to be profitable.

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