I’m riffing on database design and modeling in an agile methodology. In the previous post here I suggested that we might cheat a little and design database schemas 2-4 weeks in advance of their use… further, I suggested that to maximize agility we should limit the design to a conceptual schema. In this post I’m going to limit the scope little more by considering the use of a database in a restful application.

I am not going to fully define the REST architecture here… but if you are a systems architect you should know this inside and out… what I will say is that sometimes, in order to build a RESTful application, you will find yourself using the database to store the application state. What I want to say here is that when the application stores state in a database that must persist across boundaries in your business process… but that is not required to persist across business processes… then you do not need to model this. Let the programmers do their worst. In this case database tables play the role of working storage (a very old term that dates me… at least I did not say “Data Division”)… and programmers need to be completely free to add and subtract data elements in their programs as required.

I also have a question for the architects out there…

When programmers touch relational data they typically go through one or more abstractions: maybe they call an XML-based RESTful web service… or maybe they write the service themselves and in the service call an ORB-thingie like Hibernate. I’ve seen terrible schema signs that result from programmers building to an object model without looking at the resulting relational model out of the other end. So… when we assign data architects to build a relational schema to underlie an object-oriented programming language… should we architect up the stack and deliver the relational schema, the ORB layer, and/or the RESTful CRUD services for the objects? We are starting down that path… but I thought that I would ask…