How DBMS Vendors Admit to an Architectural Limitation: Part 1 – Oracle Exadata

Database vendors don’t usually admit to shortcomings… they protest that they have no shortcomings until the market suggests otherwise… then they make some sort of change that signals an admission. This post will explore three of these admissions: Oracle and the shared-nothing architecture, DB2 on the mainframe and the shared-nothing architecture, and Teradata and in-memory…

Thoughts on Oracle 12c…

  Here are some quick thoughts on Oracle 12c…   First, I appreciate the tone of the announcements. They were sober and smart.   I love the pluggable database stuff. It fits into the trends I have discussed here and here. Instead of consolidating virtual machines on multi-core processors and incurring the overhead of virtual operating…

Who is How Columnar? Exadata, Teradata, and HANA – Part 2: Column Processing

In my last post here I suggested that there were three levels of maturity around column orientation and described the first level, PAX, which provides columnar compression. This apparently is the level Exadata operates at with its Hybrid Columnar Compression. In this post we will consider the next two levels of maturity: early materialized column…

Who is How Columnar? Exadata, Teradata, and HANA – Part 1: Column Compression

There are three forms of columnar-orientation currently deployed by database systems today. Each builds upon the next. The simplest form uses column-orientation to provide better data compression. The next level of maturity stores columnar data in separate structures to support columnar projection. The most mature implementations support a columnar database engine that performs relational algebra…