Cloud DBMS < High Performance DBMS

English: Cloud
English: Cloud (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In my post here I suggested that database computing was becoming a special case of high-performance computing. This trend will bump up against the trend towards cloud computing and the bump will be noisy.

In the case of general commercial computing customers running cloudy virtualized servers paid a 5%-20% performance penalty… but the economics still worked for the cloud side.

For high-performance database computing it is unclear how much the penalty will be? If a virtualized, cloudy, database gives up performance because SIMD becomes problematic, priming the cache becomes hard, CPU stalls become more common, and there is a move from a shared nothing architecture to SANs or SAN-like shared data devices, then the penalty may be 300%-500% and the cloud databases will likely lose.

As I noted in the series starting here, there are lots of issues around high-performance database computing in the cloud. It will be interesting to see how the database vendors manage the bump and the noise. So keep an eye out. If your database of choice starts to look cloudy… if it becomes virtualized and it starts moving from a shared-nothing cluster to a SAN… then you will know which side of the bump they are betting on. And if they pick the cloudy side then you need to ask how they plan to architect the system to hold the penalty to under 20%…

I also mentioned in that series that in-memory databases had an advantage over peripheral-based databases as they did not have to pay a penalty for de-coupling the IO bandwidth that is part of a shared-nothing cluster. But even those vendors have to manage the fact that the database is abstracted… virtualized… away from the hardware.

If I were King I would develop a high-performance database that implemented the features of a cloud database: elasticity, easy provisioning, multi-tenancy; over bare metal. Then you might get the best of both worlds.

The Best Data Warehouse Spin of 2011

At this time of the year bloggers everywhere look back and reflect. Some use the timing to highlight significant achievements… and it is in the spirit that I would like to announce my choice for the best marketing in the data warehouse vendor space for 2011.

Marketing is a difficult task. Marketeers need to walk a line between reality and bull-pucky. They need to appeal to real and apparent needs yet differentiate. Often they need to generate spin to fuzz a good story by a competitors marketing or to de-emphasize some short-coming in their own product line.

Below is a picture taken on the floor of a prospect where we engaged in a competitive proof-of-concept. The customer requested that vendors ship a single rack configuration… and so we did.

But the marketing coup is that the vendor on the right, Teradata, told the customer that this is a single rack configuration and that they are in compliance. The customer has asked us if this is reasonable?

This creative marketing spin wins the 2011 award going away… against very tough competition.

I expect this marketing approach to start a trend in the space. Soon we will see warehouse appliance vendors claiming that 1TB = 50TB due to compression… or was that already done this year?

Sorry to be cynical… but I hope that the picture and story provide you with a giggle… and that the giggle helps you to start a happy holiday season.

– Rob Klopp