The Squeeze Hits Teradata

The SqueezeTeradata stock is falling hard due to guidance here that they may miss revenue targets. Analysts are downgrading the stock… but mostly from Buy to Neutral.

Normally stock prices would not be a relevant topic for this blog… but in this case I believe that the Squeeze I suggested first in October of 2012 and then again in February of this year (here and here) has started to affect Teradata revenues.

Note that the Squeeze should affect Netezza, Exadata, and Greenplum as well… but the effect will not be so directly reflected in the stock prices of IBM, Oracle, or EMC/VMWare/GE.

 

Oracle 12c IMDB Announcement at OOW13

SAP4OOWI changed the picture to show you the billboard SAP bought on US101N right across from the O HQ…

– Rob

Larry Ellison announced a new in-memory capability for Oracle 12c last night. There is little solid information available but taken at face value the new feature is significant… very cool… and fairly capable.

In short it appears that users have the ability to pin a table into memory in a columnar format. The new feature provides level 3 (see here) columnar capabilities… data is stored compressed and processed using vector and SIMD instruction sets. The pinned data is a redundant copy of the table in-memory… so INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE and data loads queries will use the row store and data is copied and converted to the in-memory columnar format.

As you can imagine there are lots of open questions. Here are some… and I’ll try to sort out answers in the next several weeks:

  1. It seems that data is converted row-to-columnar in real-time using a 2-phased commit. This will significantly slow down OLTP performance. LE suggested that there was a significant speed-up for OLTP based on performance savings from eliminating indexes required for analytics. This is a little disingenuous, methinks… as you will most certainly see a significant degradation when you compare OLTP performance without indexes (or with a couple of OLTP-centric indexes) and with the in-memory columnar feature on to OLTP performance without the redundant copy and format to columnar effort. So be careful. The use case suggested: removing analytic indexes and using the in-memory column store is solid and real… but if you have already optimized for OLTP and removed the analytic indexes you are likely to see performance drop.
  2. It is not clear whether the columnar data is persisted to disk/flash. It seems like maybe it is not. This implies that on start-up or recovery data is read from the row store on-disk tables and logs and converted to columnar. This may significantly impact start-up and recovery for OLTP systems.
  3. It is unclear how columnar tables are joined to row tables. It seems that maybe this is not possible… or maybe there is a dynamic conversion from one form to another? Note that it was mentioned that is possible for columnar data to be joined to columnar data. Solving for heterogeneous joins would require some sophisticated optimization. I suspect that when any row table is mentioned in a query that the row join engine is used. In this case analytic queries may run significantly slower as the analytic indexes will have been removed.
  4. Because of this and of item #2 it is unclear how this feature plays with Exadata. For lots of reasons I suspect that they do not play well and that Exadata cannot use the new feature. For example, there is no mention of new extended memory options for the Exadata appliance… and you can be sure that this feature will require more memory.

There was a new hardware system announced that uses this in-memory capability… If you add all of this up it may be that this is a system designed to run SAP applications. In fact, before the presentation on in-memory there was a long (-winded) presentation of a new Fujitsu system and the SAP SD benchmark was specifically mentioned. This was not likely an accident. So… maybe what we have is a counter to HANA for SAP apps… not a data warehouse at all.

As I said… we’ll see as the technical details emerge. If the architectural constraints 1-4 above hold then this will require some work for Oracle to compete with HANA for SAP apps or for data warehouse workloads…

SQLFire, Exalytics, TimesTen, and HANA… a quick comparison

Gemfire

As you may have noticed I’m looking at in-memory databases (IMDB) these days… Here are some quick architectural observations on VMWare‘s SQLFire, Oracle’s Exalytics and TimesTen offerings, and SAP HANA.

It is worth noting up front that I am looking to see how these products might be used to build a generalized data mart or a data warehouse… In other words I am not looking to compare them for special case applications. This is important because each of these products has some extremely cool features that allow them to be applied to application-specific purposes with a narrow scope of data and queries… maybe in a later blog I can try to look at some narrow use-cases.

Further, to make this quick blog tractable I am going to assume that the mart/dw problem to be solved requires more data than can fit on one server node… and I am going to ignore features that let queries access data that resides on disk… in-memory or bust.

Finally I will assume that the SQL dialect supported is sufficient and not drill into details there. I will look at architecture not SQL features…

Simply put I am going to look at a three characteristics:

  • Will the architecture support ad hoc queries?
  • Does the architecture support scale-out?
  • Can we say anything with regards to price/performance expectations?

Exalytics is a smart-aggregate store that sits over an Oracle database to offload aggregate query workload (see my previous post here or the Rittman Mead post here which declares: “Oracle Exalytics uses a specially enhanced version of Oracle TimesTen, Oracle’s in-memory database, to cache commonly used aggregates used in dashboards, analyses and other BI objects.” Exalytics does not support a scale-out shared-nothing architecture but it can scale up by adding nodes with new aggregate data. Queries access data within the aggregate structure and it is not possible to join to data off the Exalytics node… so ad hoc is out. Within these limits, which preclude Exalytics from being considered as a general platform for a mart or warehouse, Exalytics provides dictionary-based compression which should provide around 5X compression to reduce the amount of memory required and reduce the amount of hardware required.

TimesTen can do more. It is a general RDBMS. But it was designed for OLTP. I assume that the reason that Oracle has not rolled it out as a general-purpose data mart or data warehouse has to do with constraints that grow from those OLTP architectural roots. For example, BI queries run longer and require more data than a OLTP query… and even with data in-memory temporary storage is required for each query… and memory utilization is a product of the amount of data required and the amount of time the data has to inhabit memory… so BI queries put far more pressure on an in-memory DBMS. There are techniques to mitigate this… but you have to build the techniques in from the ground up.

I imagine that this is why TimesTen works for Exalytics, though. A OLAP query against a pre-aggregated cube does not graze an entire mart or warehouse. It is contained and “small data” (for my wacky take re: Exalytics and Exadata see here).

TimeTen is not sharded… so scalability is an issue. Oracle gets around this nicely by allowing you to partition data across instances and have the application route queries to the appropriate server. But this approach will not support joins across partitions so it severely limits scalability in a general-purpose mart or warehouse.

SQLFire is a very interesting new product built on top of Gemfire… and therefore mature from the start. SQLFire is more scalable than TimesTen/Exalytics. It supports sharded data in a cluster of servers. But SQLFire has the limitation that it cannot join data across shards (they call them partitions… see here) so it will be hard to support ad hoc queries… They provide the ability to replicate tables to support any sort of joins. If, for example, you replicate small dimension tables to coexist with sharded fact tables all joins are supported. This solution is problematic if you have multiple fact tables which must be joined… and replication of data uses more memory… but SQLFire has the foundation in place to become BI-capable over time.

Performance in an in-memory database comes first and foremost from eliminating disk I/O. All three IMDB product provide this capability. Then performance comes from the efficient use of compression. TimeTen incorporates Oracles dictionary-based “columnar” compression (I so hate this term… it is designed to make people think that Oracle products are sort-of columnar… but so far they are not). Then performance comes from columnar projection… the ability to avoid touching all data in a row to process a query. Neither TimesTen nor SQLFire are columnar databases. Then performance comes from parallel execution. Neither TimesTen nor SQLFire can involve all cores on a single query to my knowledge.

Price comes from compression as well. The more highly compressed the data is the less memory required to store it. Further, if data can be used without decompressing it, then less working memory is required. As noted, TimesTen has a compression capability. SQLFire does not appear to compress data. Neither can use compressed data. Note that 2X compression cuts the amout of memory/hardware required in half or more… 4X cuts it to a quarter… and so on. So this is significant.

Now for some transparency… I started the research for this blog, and composed a 1st draft, last Spring while I was at EMC Greenplum. I am now at SAP working with HANA. So… I will not go into HANA at great length… but I will point out that: HANA fully supports a shared-nothing architetcture… so it is fully scalable; HANA is fully parallel and able to use all cores for each query; HANA fully supports columnar tables so it provides deep compression and the ability to use the compressed data in execution. This is not remarkable as HANA was designed from the bottom up to support both BI and OLTP workloads while TimesTen and SQLFire started from a purely OLTP architectural foundation.

References:

vFabric SQLFire User’s Guide

Oracle Times Ten In-Memory Database Architectural Overview

Commercial Post Update: HANA and Exalytics and Teradata and IMDB Economics

English: Hawaiian spear fisherman near Hana; M...
English: Hawaiian spear fisherman near Hana; Maui, Hawai‘i. ca. 1890. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here are links to several commercial posts on the Experience HANA Blog FYI…

The Five Minute Rule and HANA: This is a rehash of my posts here applying the famous Five Minute Rule to in-memory databases.

HANA & Exalytics: There is Barely Any Comparison: This is a rehash of my post here pointing out that Exalytics and HANA do not really compete.

HANA vs. Teradata – Part 1: This is a response to some poor thinking posted by Teradata. There is some new content that could be worth a look.

HANA vs. Teradata – Part 2: This continues the response… but it is a rehash of the post here on the rational economics of in-memory databases. Frankly, I had just reread the Teradata posts and wrote this while still annoyed… as a result it is a little flip and despite the junk posted by Teradata I might have shown them a little more respect…

Exalytics vs. Exadata: This post suggests some oddness in Oracle’s positioning of Exalytics and Exadata… maybe worth a look.

30+ Year Old Database Architecture: DB2, Oracle, Postgres, Teradata, Sybase, and More…

As you look at the enterprise RDBMS marketplace today you will find something shocking… almost every product in the market is built based on designs and concepts that are over thirty years old. IBM’s System R grew into DB2 and influenced Oracle before 1980. Ingres, developed before 1980, became Postgres which became Netezza and Greenplum and more. Teradata was a fresh start… around 1980.

This is not a bad thing in its own right… but imagine the hardware architectures these systems were designed and optimized for. Maybe DB2 was built for a multi-core mainframe… maybe Oracle too… maybe. Memory was tiny… so memory management was important and memory was used sparingly. Data sizes were tiny. Consider the fact that Teradata named the company based on the belief that someday way beyond the planning horizon some customers might get to a terabyte of data.

The reality is that these old designs are inefficient. They have hacked the old code to continuously extend their products. I mean this as a compliment. It is not trivial engineering to find tweaks and tack-ons that make old code work on new hardware architectures. Teradata and Netezza and Greenplum designed ways to use multiple address spaces to take advantage of multiple cores. Oracle tacked-on a shared-nothing I/O subsystem to a shared-everything architecture to stretch.

But these hacks are not efficient.

Yale is working on some new-new stuff (see here). HANA is based on a completely different design (see here). The NoSQL vendors have bent the ACID-tested rules, if not always the fundamental approaches.

I can’t help but believe that in one of these new approaches is a path forward.

If you would like to read some history of the start here is a cool link.

Who is Massively Parallel? HANA vs. Teradata and (maybe) Oracle

I have promised not to promote HANA heavily on this site… and I will keep that promise. But I want to share something with you about the HANA architecture that is not part of the normal marketing in-memory database (IMDB) message: HANA is parallel from its foundation.

What I mean by that is that when a query is executed in-memory HANA dynamically shards the data in-memory and lets each core start a thread to work on its shard.

Other shared-nothing implementations like Teradata and Greenplum, which are not built on a native parallel architecture, start multiple instances of the database to take advantage of multiple cores. If they can start an instance-per-core then they approximate the parallelism of a native implementation… at the cost of inter-instance communication. Oracle, to my knowledge, does not parallelize steps within a single instance… I could be wrong there so I’ll ask my readers to help?

As you would expect, for analytics and complex queries this architecture provides a distinct advantage. HANA customers are optimizing price models sub-second in-real-time with each quote instead of executing a once-a-week 12-hour modeling job.

June 11, 2013: You can find a more complete and up-to-date discussion of this topic here… – Rob

As you would expect HANA cannot yet stretch into the petabyte range. The current HANA sweet spot is for warehouses or marts is in the sub-TB to 20TB range.

More on Exalytics Capacity…

I found myself wondering where did the rule-of-thumb for Exalytics  that suggests that TimesTen can use 800GB of a 1TB memory space… and requires 400GB of that space for work tables leaving room for 400GB of user data… come from (it is quoted everywhere… here is an example… see question #13).

Sure enough, this rule has been around for a while in the TimesTen literature… in fact it predates Exalytics (see here).

Why is this important? The workspace per query for a TPC-A transaction is very small and the amount of time the memory is held by a TPC-A transaction is very short. But the workspace required by a TPC-H query is at least 10X the space required by a TPC-A query and the duration of a TPC-H query is at least 10X the duration of a TPC-A query. The result is at least 100X more pressure on memory utilization.

So… I suspect that the 600GB of user data I calculated here may be off by more than a little. Maybe Exalytics can support 300GB of user data or 100GB of user data or maybe 60GB?

Note that this is not bad… all of this pressure on memory is still moved to Exalytics from the Exadata RAC subsystem… where memory is dear.

As a side note… it is always important to remember that the pressure on memory is the amount of memory utilized times the duration of the utilization. This is why the data flow architecture used in modern databases like Greenplum are effective. Greenplum uses more memory per transaction but it holds the memory for less time by never (almost) writing it to disk. This is different from older database architectures like Teradata and Oracle which use disk to store intermediate results… lowering the overall amount of memory required but increasing the duration of the query. More on this here

Co-processing and Exadata

In my first blog (here) I discussed the implications of using co-processors to offload CPU. The point was that with multi-core processors it made more sense to add generalized processing hardware that could be applied to all parts of the query process than to add specialized processors that dealt with only part of the problem.

Kevin Closson has produced two videos that critically evaluate the architecture of Exadata and I strongly suggest that you view them here before you go on with this post… They are enlightening, irreverent, and make the long post I’ve been drafting on Exadata lightweight and unnecessary.

If you have seen Kevin’s post you understand that Exadata is asymmetric and unbalanced. But his post extends and generalizes my discussion of co-processing in a nice way. Co-processing is asymmetric by definition. The co-processor is not busy after it has executed on its part of the problem.

In fact, Oracle has approximately mirrored the Netezza architecture with Exadata but used commercial processors instead of FPGAs to offload I/O and predicate processing. The result is the same in both cases… underutilized processing capability. The difference is that Netezza wastes some power on relatively inexpensive FPGA processors while Exadata wastes general and expensive CPU resources that might actually be applied usefully elsewhere. And Netezza splits the processing within a shared-nothing architecture while Exadata mixes architectures adding to the inefficiency.

Exalytics vs. HANA: What are they thinking?

I’ve been trying to sort through the noise around Exalytics and see if there are any conclusions to be drawn from the architecture. But this post is more about the noise. The vast majority of the articles I’ve read posted by industry analysts suggest that Exalytics is Oracle‘s answer to SAP‘s HANA. See:

But I do not see it?

Exalytics is a smart cache that holds a redundant copy of aggregated data in memory to offload aggregate queries from your data warehouse or mart. The system is a shared-memory implementation that does not scale out as the size of the aggregates increase. It does scale up by daisy-chaining Exalytics boxes to store more aggregates. It is a read-only system that requires another DBMS as the source of the aggregated data. Exalytics provides a performance boost for Oracle including for Exadata (remember, Exadata performs aggregation in the RAC layer… when RAC is swamped Exalytics can offload some processing).

HANA is a fully functional in-memory shared-nothing columnar DBMS. It does not store a copy of the data.. it stores the data. It can be updated. HANA replaces Oracle… it does not speed it up.

I’ll post more on Exalytics… and on HANA… but there is no Exalytics vs. HANA competition ahead. There will be no Exalytics vs. HANA POCs. They are completely different technologies solving different problems with the only similarity being that they both leverage the decreasing costs of RAM to eliminate the expense of I/O to disk or SSD devices. Don’t let the common phrase “in-memory” confuse you.