Database Fog Blog

It is about Architecture… not about Marketing…

Who is How Parallel?

Product

Version/HW

Cores per Node

UoP per Node

Notes

Teradata EDW 6700H

16

32

Uses hyper-threads.
Greenplum DCA UAP Edition

16

8

Recommends 1 Segment instance for each 2 cores.
Exadata X3

12

12-24

Maybe only 12… cannot find if they use hyper-threads.
Netezza Striper

16

16

May use hyper-threads but limited by 16 FPGAs.
HANA Any Xeon E7-4800

40

80

Uses hyper-threads.

A unit of parallelism (UoP) is defined as the maximum number of  instructions that can execute in parallel on a single node for a single query. Since any program can start threads that wait I do not count these as UoP. On some CPUs vendors such as Intel allow two threads to execute instructions in-parallel in a core. This is called hyper-threading and, if implemented, it allows for two UoP on a single core.

Please feel free to comment if there is an update you would like to see included.

Update Log

April 24, 2013: Original Post… I’ll try to keep this updated over time.

6 thoughts on “Who is How Parallel?

  1. Hi Rob

    Sorry…I did try, but I can’t find a definitive reference on the Hyperthreading for Exadata either, but I can say that it uses Xeon E5-2690 (X3-2) or E7-8870 (X3-8) CPUs, which do offer HT and that there are several references (google search) from respected people/organisations indicating they use it on their X3 systems. For what it’s worth, one of my clients uses a HP DL980 G7 with E7-2830 Xeons in it and has HT enabled on that so I can’t see why they wouldn’t enable it, if it was appropriate for the type of workload.

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  2. Great info! I’m wondering if I can help put Actian ParAccel and AWS Redshift on this list. I’ve used these in the past, and have access to the technical docs, as well as implemented clusters in physical and virtual worlds. Since they use commodity hardware, we can rely on their reference architectures. How can we have an apples-to-apples comparison? Use TPC-H or TPC-DS benchmark platforms?

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